Alpharetta, Georgia

Jacqueline Venchi & Andy Scholl

Jacqueline Venchi & Andy Scholl

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Alpharetta, Georgia

3000 Old Alabama Road #116
Alpharetta, GA 30022

Phone: (770) 410-0799
Fax: (770) 410-7781
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sun: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Comments:
Join us, right next to Kroger at Haynes Bridge and Old Alabama Roads. A great destination for all of your bird feeding needs, and the best nature gifts in the north Atlanta area. Thanks, and Keep Feeding the Birds! Jacqueline and Andy and Zipper

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We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Solar Eclipse

There are numerous anecdotal accounts and observations that appear to show that many species of birds and other wildlife do react in different ways to the eclipse. These reactions can occur as the eclipse progresses and enters totality, as well as when the sun re-emerges.

 

Here are some of the reactions by birds and wildlife that have been reported to occur during previous total eclipses:

Birds

  • Confused Crooners - Songbirds have been noted to decrease their singing as an eclipse progresses, often to a point of total silence during the maximum darkness of totality. Speculations is that the darkening sky triggers the birds’ night-time behaviors.
  • Out of Sync Singers - Observations show that some birds may also be confused by the re-emergence of the sun and a “dawn chorus” of bird song might be heard just as it would be during a morning sunrise.
  • Day or Night? - Numerous bird species have been reported to return to their night-time roosting locations as the total eclipse progresses. Starlings have been noted to return in large flocks to their roosts and display agitated behavior until the light returns to normal.
  • Night or Day? - Nocturnal birds such as owls, whip-poor-wills and nighthawks have been reported to either become active, take flight or call during total eclipses.
  • Fowl Rowel - Domestic fowl and pigeons have been observed to quickly return to their roosts or coops as the eclipse darkens the sky.
  • Savvy Shorebirds - Anecdotal observations seem to imply that in general, shorebirds seem to display very limited reactions to total solar eclipses.

 

Other Wildlife

  • Early Chirpers - Crickets have been widely observed to start “chirping” as the sky darkens and then fall silent upon the re-emergence of the sun. Katydids have also been reported to demonstrate this same behavior.
  • Silent Cicadas - Cicadas have been noted to end their shrill day-time calling and fall silent as the eclipse progresses.
  • Moving Mosquitos - During the darkest portions of an eclipse, mosquitos have been noted to emerge in mass.
  • Hustling Honeybees - Honeybees have been observed to return in swarms to their hives as the eclipse darkens.
  • Dream Weavers - Orb-weaving spiders, which generally re-weave their webs every night, have been observed to dismantle their old web during the darkness of an eclipse.
  • Busy Bats - Bats have been noted to emerge from their roost as the sky darkens and then return with the re-emergence of the sun.
  • Sly Skunks - Skunks, which are largely nocturnal, have been reported to come out and start foraging as it grows darker during an eclipse.
  • Sleepy Squirrels - Squirrels are reported to retreat to their nests during a total solar eclipse.

 

Hummingbird

Hummingbird Season!

We've now hit peak hummingbird season, and for the next few weeks you will see these tiny birds' huge personalities on full display. It's time for the hummingbird wars!

 

For such a little bird, hummingbirds can be very feisty and aggressive when defending their territories; which includes nectar feeders. Multiple feeders, spread throughout your yard, will encourage more hummingbirds to visit and keep bullies at bay. We recommend a distance of about 25 feet to avoid allowing a single bird to dominate.

Speaking of feeders, these little birds have big appetites. Hummingbirds eat about every ten minutes and their diet is not made up entirely of nectar. They spend more than 25% of their time foraging for small spiders and insects to obtain essential amino acids and other nutrients.

Hummingbirds use their bill and not their tongue to catch prey while they forage near the ground and in trees. They love spiders and spider eggs and keep an eye out for small flying insects like midges, fruit flies and gnats. They also check leaves and branches for leaf hoppers, aphids and even the occasional small caterpillar.

Hummingbirds are indeed small, weighing 1/10th of an ounce; about the weight of a penny. They also lay the world’s smallest bird egg; about the size of a blueberry.

Our little hummingbirds are deceptively big on speed. They often seem to explode away from a feeder like a dragster. They typically fly at 30-45 miles per hour (48-72 kph), but can fly up to 60 mph (96 kph). They can even hover and are the only birds able to regularly fly backwards and even occasionally upside down. They can do this because of an extremely mobile shoulder joint.

Be a seasonally savvy bird feeder by installing a hummingbird feeder to draw in these little birds with the big personalities. Visit our store and we'll help you pick out everything you need to attract hummingbirds to your backyard.